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Enable Wi-Fi on Arduino MKR1000
===============================
This tutorial shows you how to enable Wi-Fi on an Arduino MKR1000 board
and connect to a Wi-Fi network.
Prerequisites
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ensure that you have met the following prerequisites before continuing
with this tutorial:
- Have an Arduino MKR1000 board.
- Have Internet connectivity to fetch remote Mynewt components.
- Have a computer to build a Mynewt application and connect to the
board over USB.
- Have a Micro-USB cable to connect the board and the computer.
- Have local Wi-Fi network that the computer is connected to and that
the MKR1000 board can join.
- Have a :doc:`Serial Port Setup <../../get_started/serial_access>`.
- Have a `Segger J-Link Debug
Probe <https://www.segger.com/jlink-debug-probes.html>`__.
- Have a `J-Link 9 pin Cortex-M
Adapter <https://www.segger.com/jlink-adapters.html#CM_9pin>`__ that
allows JTAG, SWD and SWO connections between J-Link and Cortex M
based target hardware systems
- Install the `Segger JLINK Software and documentation
pack <https://www.segger.com/jlink-software.html>`__.
- Install the Newt tool and toolchains (See :doc:`Native Installation
<../../get_started/native_install/index>`)
- Create a project space (directory structure) and populated it with
the core code repository (apache-mynewt-core) or know how to as
explained in :doc:`Creating Your First
Project <../../get_started/project_create>`.
- Read the Mynewt OS :doc:`Concepts <../../get_started/vocabulary>`
section.
.. contents::
:local:
:depth: 2
Create a Project
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Create a new project if you do not have an existing one. You can skip
this step and proceed to `fetch external packages <#%20fetchexternal>`__
if you already created a project.
Run the following commands to create a new project:
.. code-block:: console
$ mkdir ~/dev
$ cd ~/dev
$ newt new arduinowifi
Downloading project skeleton from apache/mynewt-blinky...
Installing skeleton in arduinowifi...
Project arduinowifi successfully created.
$ cd arduinowifi
$ newt install
apache-mynewt-core
$
Fetch External Packages
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mynewt uses source code provided directly from the chip manufacturer for
low level operations. Sometimes this code is licensed only for the
specific manufacturer of the chipset and cannot live in the Apache
Mynewt repository. That happens to be the case for the Arduino Zero
board which uses Atmel SAMD21. Runtime's git hub repository hosts such
external third-party packages and the Newt tool can fetch them.
To fetch the package with MCU support for Atmel SAMD21 for Arduino Zero
from the Runtime git repository, you need to add the repository to the
``project.yml`` file in your base project directory.
Mynewt uses source code provided directly from the chip manufacturer for
low level operations. Sometimes this code is licensed only for the
specific manufacturer of the chipset and cannot live in the Apache
Mynewt repository. That happens to be the case for the Arduino Zero
board which uses Atmel SAMD21. Runtime's github repository hosts such
external third-party packages and the Newt tool can fetch them.
To fetch the package with MCU support for Atmel SAMD21 for Arduino Zero
from the Runtime git repository, you need to add the repository to the
``project.yml`` file in your base project directory (``arduinowifi``).
Here is an example ``project.yml`` file with the Arduino Zero repository
added. The sections with ``mynewt_arduino_zero`` that need to be added
to your project file are highlighted.
**Note:** On Windows platforms: You need to set ``vers`` to ``0-dev``
and use the latest master branch for both repositories.
.. code-block:: console
:emphasize-lines: 7, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
$ more project.yml
project.name: "my_project"
project.repositories:
- apache-mynewt-core
- mynewt_arduino_zero
repository.apache-mynewt-core:
type: github
vers: 1-latest
user: apache
repo: mynewt-core
repository.mynewt_arduino_zero:
type: github
vers: 1-latest
user: runtimeco
repo: mynewt_arduino_zero
$
Install the project dependencies using the ``newt install`` command
(you can specify ``-v`` for verbose output):
.. code-block:: console
$ newt install
apache-mynewt-core
mynewt_arduino_zero
$
**NOTE:** If there has been a new release of a repo used in your project
since you last installed it, the ``1-latest`` version for the repo in
the ``project.yml`` file will refer to the new release and will not
match the installed files. In that case you will get an error message
saying so and you will need to run ``newt upgrade`` to overwrite the
existing files with the latest codebase.
Create a Target for the Bootloader
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You need to create two targets for the MKR1000 board, one for the
bootloader and one for the ``winc1500_wifi`` application. Run the
following ``newt target`` commands, from your project directory, to
create a bootloader target. We name the target ``mkr1000_boot``.
.. code-block:: console
$ newt target create mkr1000_boot
$ newt target set mkr1000_boot bsp=@mynewt_arduino_zero/hw/bsp/arduino_mkr1000
$ newt target set mkr1000_boot app=@mcuboot/boot/mynewt
$ newt target set mkr1000_boot build_profile=optimized
$ newt target set mkr1000_boot syscfg=BSP_ARDUINO_ZERO_PRO=1
Create a Target for the Wi-Fi Application
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the following ``newt target`` commands to create a target for the
``winc1500_wifi`` application in the arduino repository. We name the
application target ``mkr1000_wifi``.
.. code-block:: console
$ newt target create mkr1000_wifi
$ newt target set mkr1000_wifi app=@mynewt_arduino_zero/apps/winc1500_wifi
$ newt target set mkr1000_wifi bsp=@mynewt_arduino_zero/hw/bsp/arduino_mkr1000
$ newt target set mkr1000_wifi build_profile=debug
$ newt target set mkr1000_boot syscfg=BSP_ARDUINO_ZERO_PRO=1
Build the Bootloader
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the ``newt build mkr1000_boot`` command to build the bootloader:
.. code-block:: console
$ newt build mkr1000_boot
Building target targets/mkr1000_boot
Compiling repos/mcuboot/boot/bootutil/src/image_rsa.c
Compiling repos/mcuboot/boot/bootutil/src/image_ec256.c
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/crypto/mbedtls/src/aes.c
Compiling repos/mcuboot/boot/bootutil/src/image_ec.c
Compiling repos/mcuboot/boot/bootutil/src/image_validate.c
Compiling repos/mcuboot/boot/mynewt/src/main.c
...
Archiving util_mem.a
Linking ~/dev/arduinowifi/bin/targets/mkr1000_boot/app/boot/mynewt/mynewt.elf
Target successfully built: targets/mkr1000_boot
$
Build the Wi-Fi Application
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the ``newt build mkr1000_wifi`` command to build the wi-fi
application image:
.. code-block:: console
$newt build mkr1000_wifi
Building target targets/mkr1000_wifi
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/boot/bootutil/src/image_ec.c
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/boot/bootutil/src/image_ec256.c
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/boot/bootutil/src/image_rsa.c
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/boot/bootutil/src/image_validate.c
Compiling repos/apache-mynewt-core/boot/bootutil/src/loader.c
...
Archiving util_mem.a
Linking ~/dev/arduinowifi/bin/targets/mkr1000_wifi/app/apps/winc1500_wifi/winc1500_wifi.elf
Target successfully built: targets/mkr1000_wifi
$
Sign and Create the Wi-Fi Application Image
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the ``newt create-image mkr1000_wifi 1.0.0`` command to sign and
create an image file for the Wi-Fi application. You may assign an
arbitrary version (e.g. 1.0.0) number.
.. code-block:: console
$newt create-image mkr1000_wifi 1.0.0
Compiling bin/targets/mkr1000_wifi/generated/src/mkr1000_wifi-sysinit-app.c
Archiving mkr1000_wifi-sysinit-app.a
Linking ~/dev/arduinowifi/bin/targets/mkr1000_wifi/app/apps/winc1500_wifi/winc1500_wifi.elf
App image succesfully generated: ~/dev/arduinowifi/bin/targets/mkr1000_wifi/app/apps/winc1500_wifi/winc1500_wifi.img
$
Connect to the Board
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- Connect your computer to the MKR1000 board with the Micro-USB cable.
- Connect the debug probe to the JTAG port on the board using the Jlink
9-pin adapter and cable.
|J-Link debug probe to MKR1000|
Mynewt will download and debug the target through this port. You should
see a green LED come on and indicates the board has power.
Load the Bootloader onto the Board
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the ``newt load mkr1000_boot`` command to load the bootloader onto
the board:
.. code-block:: console
$ newt load mkr1000_boot
Loading bootloader
$
Load the Wi-Fi Application Image onto the Board
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Run the ``newt load mkr1000_wifi`` command to load the wifi application
onto the board:
.. code-block:: console
$ newt load mkr1000_wifi
Loading app image into slot 1
$
Setup a Serial Connection Between Your Computer and the Board
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Set up a serial connection from your computer to the MKR1000 board (See
:doc:`Serial Port Setup <../../get_started/serial_access>`). On the
MKR1000 board, the TX pin is PIN 14 and the RX pin in PIN 13. |Serial
Connection to MKR1000|
Locate the port, in the /dev directory on your computer, that the
serial connection uses. The format of the port name is platform
dependent:
- Mac OS uses the format ``tty.usbserial-<some identifier>``.
- Linux uses the format ``TTYUSB<N>``, where ``N`` is a number. For
example, TTYUSB2.
- MinGW on Windows uses the format ``ttyS<N>``, where ``N`` is a
number. You must map the port name to a Windows COM port:
``/dev/ttyS<N>`` maps to ``COM<N+1>``. For example, ``/dev/ttyS2``
maps to ``COM3``.
You can also use the Windows Device Manager to find the COM port
number.
.. code-block:: console
$ ls /dev/tty*usbserial*
/dev/tty.usbserial-1d13
$
Start Wi-Fi via console
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Use a terminal emulation program to communicate with the board over the
serial port. This tutorial shows a Minicom set up. Run the minicom
command with the serial port you located on your computer:
**Note:** On Windows, you can use the PuTTY application.
.. code-block:: console
$ minicom -D /dev/tty.usbserial-1d13 -b 115200
Type ``wifi start`` to start Wi-Fi.
.. code-block:: console
:emphasize-lines: 10
Welcome to minicom 2.7.1
OPTIONS:
Compiled on May 17 2017, 15:29:14.
Port /dev/tty.usbserial, 15:12:10
Press Meta-Z for help on special keys
138465 compat> wifi start
144570 compat> (APP)(INFO)Chip ID 1503a0
(APP)(INFO)Firmware ver : 19.4.4
(APP)(INFO)Min driver ver : 19.3.0
(APP)(INFO)Curr driver ver: 19.3.0
wifi_init : 0
Connect to the local Wi-Fi network. Note that the MKR1000 board only
supports 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi networks.
Run the ``wifi connect`` command and specify your network and . After
you are connected to your wi-fi network, run the ``net service`` command
to start network services.
.. code-block:: console
:emphasize-lines: 1, 8
wifi connect
037624 wifi_request_scan : 0
037627 compat> scan_results 7: 0
038454 wifi_connect : 0
039451 connect_done : 0
039958 dhcp done
192.168.0.135
040169 get sys time response 2017.7.12-22.41.33
net service
The board is connected to the network succesfully and has IP address:
192.168.0.135
Establish TCP Connection and Talk!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
From a terminal on your computer, telnet to ports 7, 9, or 19 using the
IP address your board has been assigned. Type something on this terminal
and see the console output (on minicom). Can you see the difference in
the behaviors?
.. code-block:: console
$telnet 192.168.0.135 7
Trying 192.168.0.135...
Connected to 192.168.0.135.
Escape character is '^]'.
hello
hello
^]
telnet> q
$
One port echoes whatever is typed, one discards everything it gets, and
the third spews out bits constantly. Type ``wifi stop`` to disable WiFi
on the Arduino board.
.. |J-Link debug probe to MKR1000| image:: ../pics/mkr1000-jlink.jpg
.. |Serial Connection to MKR1000| image:: ../pics/mkr1000-serial.jpg