tree: 281b8a7b52ec4a707468823069d43bb0e6d1b872 [path history] [tgz]
  1. README.md
  2. karaf-config-example-blueprint/
  3. karaf-config-example-features/
  4. karaf-config-example-listener/
  5. karaf-config-example-managed-factory/
  6. karaf-config-example-managed/
  7. karaf-config-example-scr/
  8. karaf-config-example-static/
  9. pom.xml
examples/karaf-config-example/README.md

Apache Karaf Configuration Example

Abstract

This example shows how to use configuration in your application, introducing different approach:

  • the static approach using ConfigurationAdmin service, where the configuration is loaded once, on demand.
  • the ManagedService approach which is dynamic. Your application receives a notification when the configuration changes.
  • the ManagedServiceFactory dynamic approach that can handle several configurations created.
  • the ConfigurationListener approach is able to listen for any change in all configurations.
  • the blueprint approach is similar to Managed dynamic approach using blueprint
  • the scr approach is similar to Managed dynamic approach using scr

During the installation of a configuration example feature, a configuration is created with the org.apache.karaf.example.config persistent id. The configuration uses etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg configuration file.

Artifacts

  • karaf-config-example-static uses the ConfigurationAdmin service to retrieve the configuration identified by a PID (Persistent ID).
  • karaf-config-example-managed uses the dynamic approach exposing a Managed service.
  • karaf-config-example-managed-factory dealing with several configurations created using a ManagedFactory service.
  • karaf-config-example-listener listens for any change in any configuration.
  • karaf-config-example-blueprint uses configuration within a blueprint container.
  • karaf-config-example-scr uses configuration within a scr component.
  • karaf-config-example-features contains a Apache Karaf features repository used for deployment.

Build

The build uses Apache Maven. Simply use:

mvn clean install

Feature and Deployment

On a running Karaf instance, register the features repository using:

karaf@root()> feature:repo-add mvn:org.apache.karaf.examples/karaf-config-example-features/4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/xml

Usage

Static

If you install the karaf-config-example-static feature, it will create the etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg configuration file with the org.apache.karaf.example.config configuration. At startup, the karaf-config-example-static feature will display the content of the configuration:

karaf@root()> feature:install karaf-config-example-static 
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg
foo = bar
hello = world
org.apache.karaf.features.configKey = org.apache.karaf.example.config
service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config

Managed

You can also test the dynamic approach using karaf-config-example-managed feature:

karaf@root()> feature:install karaf-config-example-managed

Then, you can install the karaf-config-example-common feature providing the configuration. Then, you can see the managed service called:

karaf@root()> feature:install karaf-config-example-common
Configuration changed
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg
foo = bar
org.apache.karaf.features.configKey = org.apache.karaf.example.config
service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config

If you change the configuration (using config:edit command), you can see also the managed service called:

karaf@root()> config:edit org.apache.karaf.example.config
karaf@root()> config:property-set hello world
karaf@root()> config:update
Configuration changed
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg
foo = bar
hello = world
org.apache.karaf.features.configKey = org.apache.karaf.example.config
service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config

Managed factory

The managed service factory approach allows you to deal with several configurations of the same kind. The “base” pid is org.apache.karaf.example.config, then you ca create a new configuration based on this one. For instance, you can create etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config-example.cfg containing:

hello=world

Then you will see in the Karaf shell console:

karaf@root()> New configuration with pid org.apache.karaf.example.config.994408d3-b950-4ef5-9cf0-eaaad97922f3
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config-test.cfg
hello = world
service.factoryPid = org.apache.karaf.example.config
service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config.994408d3-b950-4ef5-9cf0-eaaad97922f3

If you remove etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config-example.cfg file, you will see:

Delete configuration with pid org.apache.karaf.example.config.994408d3-b950-4ef5-9cf0-eaaad97922f3

Configuration listener

The karaf-config-example-listener feature installs a configuration listener:

karaf@root()> feature:install karaf-config-example-listener

Then you can create etc/my.config.cfg configuration file, you will see:

Configuration my.config has been updated

If you delete etc/my.config.cfg configuration file, you will see:

Configuration my.config has been deleted

Blueprint

Apache Aries Blueprint provides Blueprint CM that deals with configuration.

Especially, you can use a property placeholder to easily load a configuration and inject some properties in your bean.

It's what we do in the karaf-config-example-blueprint feature:

karaf@root()> feature:install karaf-config-example-blueprint

You will see:

hello = world

Then, if you change etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg file to set hello property value to other, you will see:

hello = other

SCR

SCR natively supports configuration.

It's what karaf-config-example-scr feature is using:

karaf@root()> karaf-config-example-scr

At installation time, we can see the configuration display:

service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config
hello = world
org.apache.karaf.features.configKey = org.apache.karaf.example.config
component.name = my-component
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg
component.id = 1
foo = bar

Then, we can add a new property in etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg configuration file, it's displayed by the SCR component:

service.pid = org.apache.karaf.example.config
hello = world
org.apache.karaf.features.configKey = org.apache.karaf.example.config
component.name = my-component
felix.fileinstall.filename = file:/home/jbonofre/Workspace/karaf/assemblies/apache-karaf/target/apache-karaf-4.2.3-SNAPSHOT/etc/org.apache.karaf.example.config.cfg
component.id = 1
foo = bar
test = other